Posts Tagged ‘Christie Lohr’

Fashion Jobs – Career Advice with Christie Lohr – The Internship

Friday, September 19th, 2014

Style Nine to Five - Fashion Jobs

Fashion Jobs - Internship Advice

 

With so much competition nowadays in virtually every industry and career field, getting a job right out of school with no real work experience to cite on your resume has become rather difficult. This is especially true for the fashion industry as many positions call for practical and applicable skills that could only have been acquired from performing tasks while on the job. For example, think PR – although having a degree in it is one thing, textbooks and classes alone are not enough to prepare you for the unpredictable nature of the real job. Only past work experience can. That is where the internship comes in. While individuals generally recognize the merit of an internship, sometimes the idea of being a temporary/contract employee, and not being well compensated for the work performed may discourage many from doing the best that they can during the duration of their internship. This, according to Christie, is one of the biggest career faux pas you can make, and she’s here to tell you why.

 

Christie: I have always been a fan of internships. Not only can you learn and develop so many useful skills during an internship that you will ultimately take with you throughout your professional career, it is also a great opportunity to build lasting connections. Although most internships (especially in the fashion industry) may not offer the best compensation in comparison to the amount of time that you’ll likely be putting into it, that doesn’t make the experience any less valuable than a permanent position with the company. I always say: treat your internship like it’s any other job where you would want to make the best impression possible. If anything, you want to prove yourself even more in an internship scenario because you’re not a permanent employee for the company yet. An internship can either land you a future job, or a recommendation that will lead to your future job, or it can leave you with a bad professional reputation instead.

 

Although a company may not be in a position to hire you yet, if you demonstrate your abilities, tenacity and overall strong work ethic during your internship, you’ll definitely be the first person they think of when an actual job opening comes along. After all, you’ll save them the time and money of advertising for the posting and interviewing for it too. The relationships you establish through your internship may very well land you a job, even if it’s just through a glowing recommendation from your employer. However, the opposite of this is also very true, in the sense that if you prove to be nothing but lazy and unmotivated during your internship, not only will you likely never hear from the company again, but your employer probably won’t have many positive things to say about you afterwards either. Remember, every job or internship you take on will leave some sort of mark on your professional track record. It’s up to you whether you want to make it a good one or not.

 

Photo by Michelle Morton

 

Written by Anna Zhao

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.

Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram for the latest fashion jobs, career advice and fashion trends!

Fashion Career Advice From Christie Lohr – Reach Out to Break Out

Friday, August 29th, 2014

style nine to five - fashion jobs Christie Lohr

To any fashion hopeful who is just starting out in his or her career, having a mentor is one of the best ways to gain invaluable information regarding the industry. Whether it’s interview advice, insider knowledge about what employers look for, or tips to succeed in your personal endeavours, speaking with a seasoned veteran will definitely be a rewarding experience. While the idea of reaching out to anybody you don’t know can seem like a daunting task at first, Christie’s here to tell you why it will all be worth it, and that it isn’t such a scary thing after all.

 

Christie Lohr: What inspired me to pursue a career in the fashion industry was a fated meeting with a fashion expert in my early 20s. I was an eager young fashion grad, fresh out of college and working as an Assistant Manager at Le Chateau. I was on my way to a Nelly Furtado concert at the Vogue on Granville Street in Downtown Vancouver when I was suddenly stopped by this fashion expert who wanted to take my photo for her upcoming street style feature for The Province newspaper. At the time, I was so excited to be featured in a major publication like The Province. This fated meeting definitely inspired me to explore my options in the fashion industry and learn more about how I could get involved. I thought to myself, how cool would it be to speak with this fashion reporter and see if I could assist her in any way? Acting on that thought, I found her email address online and proceeded to send her a message, thanking her for the feature, as well as inquiring if I could be a part of what she was doing. I don’t know if I expected a reply at the time, and quite honestly, whenever you do decide to reach out to someone, know that they probably have a busy schedule so don’t be discouraged if you don’t see a reply right away! I heard back from her after a few days and we scheduled a coffee meeting, where I was able to pick her brain and inquire if I could be of any help to her work. Although she wasn’t even looking for assistance, just because I reached out and asked, she brought me on board!

 

I think the moral of my story is simply to not be afraid to reach out to anyone you look up to as a mentor, or who you aspire to be like. Yes we’re all busy, but I can tell you that there’s nothing more special and flattering than receiving a thoughtful email from someone who’s truly passionate about the industry and who expresses a strong desire to learn from me. I know I was so eager to learn (and still am) back when I was in my early 20s and just starting out in my fashion career. I’m at a point in my life now where I want to give back by offering my time to speak with and educate any driven young individual, and I know that many industry insiders share my sentiments. We were all at the same place once upon a time, and I can definitely say that I would not be where I am today without my mentors.

Whenever you meet someone in the industry who you want to get to know more, send them a follow-up email and schedule out a time to talk! You’d be surprised at how many doors can open for you and how much you can learn just from taking the first step to connect.

 

Photo by Laura McIntosh

Written by Anna Zhao 

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.

Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram for the latest fashion jobs, career advice and fashion trends!

Fashion Jobs – Career Chats with Christie Lohr: Finding Your Calling

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

 Style Nine to Five - Fashion Jobs Canada

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When we were younger, we all had our own aspirations as to what we wanted to become. Perhaps a doctor, a director, an astronaut, or even a princess; yes life was simple back then. As our childhood slowly transitioned into adulthood, we became increasingly unsure of what we wanted to do with our lives and what careers to pursue. With exposure to various external influences, suddenly the professional options available to us became endless. As soon as you factor schooling, training, work experience, and above all, time and money into the picture, it’s enough to give anyone a headache. How exactly are we supposed to go about discovering our callings in life? Not all of us are fortunate enough to know from the get go what we want to pursue. Luckily, Christie’s here to give us her take on how to tackle the daunting task of setting our careers on the right track.

 

Anna: I know we’ve already established that you knew from a young age that fashion was the industry for you. From there on out, how did you narrow down exactly what you wanted to do within it?

Christie: I knew I had to start somewhere, so I began my fashion career as a part time sales associate. The position exposed me to various aspects of fashion retail and also allowed me to develop my leadership skills. Because I was always motivated to go above and beyond what was expected from me, I was eventually promoted to a store manager position. Throughout my retail experience, I realized that I really enjoyed the human aspect of the job: working with a team, impacting individuals, meeting new people, and always thinking of creative ways to better my store’s results. When I transitioned into a buying position, I dealt with a lot more paperwork and realized that I missed the same human aspect that I previously mentioned. This led me to realize that perhaps human resources within the fashion industry was a good path for me.

Anna: What advice would you give to individuals that don’t have a clue what industry they want to be a part of, let alone the exact job?

Christie: I’m a firm believer that there is always something that we each naturally gravitate towards. For me, that was fashion, but it could be anything. Where our interests lie is definitely the first and best indication of what industry we should explore. With regards to the exact job description, take a moment to consider what you’re naturally good at. For me, it was my leadership and take-charge attitude that aided me throughout my life, but for you, that could be writing, merchandising, or artistic abilities. Take time to become an expert in what you do and seek out positions that capitalize on those assets.

Anna: After you’ve narrowed down the industry, where do you go from there?

Christie: I can’t stress the importance of trying your hand out at different things enough. Only through doing different things can you discover what you truly like and don’t like. It’s easy to assume what a certain job may entail, but actually experiencing the job is an entirely different beast. For example, I thought that I would really enjoy the position of a buyer. However, once I actually tried my hand out at buying and saw what tasks needed to be performed, I realized that buying was not for me. Sometimes, it takes recognizing what you don’t enjoy to realize what you do!

Anna: What do you do if you discover something in your current job/career that you really don’t find enjoyment in it? Do you have any advice for someone looking to start over doing something different, but may have certain reservations towards doing so?

Christie: First off, before anyone decides to exit from an existing job or career, I think it’s important to ask yourself, “did I do all that I could to make the most out of my position?” I touched on this subject in a past Career Chat (link here), but I strongly believe that trying to go above and beyond your role, and creating opportunities to do different tasks outside of what’s expected of you is a great way to regain a sense of satisfaction in what you do. Beyond that, if you know it’s time for a change in career, but find it difficult to make a decision, boy can I tell you that I’ve been there! The bills always need to be paid, so oftentimes, taking the leap and quitting your job really isn’t the most feasible option. However, there are many ways to get started in exploring your secondary interests while you remain in your current position. For me, that meant starting my own blog so I could begin building up my own personal brand, as I knew that was highly important for the next stage in my career. It may be hard to find the time to do what we want to do part-time, outside of work, but it’s a great way to work towards our dream job. It’s all about making a commitment to do both if leaving your current job is temporarily out of the question!

Photo by: Laura McIntosh

By: Anna Zhao

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.

Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram for the latest fashion jobs, career advice and fashion trends!

Fashion Jobs – Career Chats With Christie Lohr: Asking For What You Want

Thursday, July 31st, 2014

Style Nine to Five - Fashion Jobs

 

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For many individuals that are just starting out in their careers, one of the biggest mental hurdles to overcome is not being afraid to express opinions openly and transparently in the face of management and professional networks. To clarify, the opinions which I speak of are purely professional in nature and relate directly to career development. Speaking from personal experience, I know that it’s so easy to fall into the trap of believing that if we just work hard enough in our given roles, we will eventually be discovered and then whisked off for bigger and better things. What we often forget is that when it comes to career growth and development, it’s up to ourselves to seek out opportunities that reflect our fields of interest. Sometimes that means that we have to ask for what we want; there really isn’t anyone else to do it for us. Yes, that seems like a daunting task initially, but perhaps Christie can shed some more light on this topic and in turn, give us all a well needed confidence boost to just go for it.

Christie Lohr: “I’ve always recognized myself as a bit of an introvert and some of my shyness has stayed with me throughout my career. With that said, that has never been an obstacle that has obstructed me from asking for what I want. I think too many people have the misconception in their heads that “asking for what you want” is the equivalent of demanding something: a raise, a promotion, or otherwise, hence the reservations that come up in regards to doing so. For me, I’ve never approached the task of asking for more opportunities as a demand, rather, I see it as a chance to openly express my personal interests regarding various ventures. If you’ve already proven yourself as a reliable worker in any present roles, then chances are management or contacts also recognize the same ability in you. However, here is where a lack of communication occurs that often prevent people from moving forward in their careers. Yes, you may be recognized as being great in what you currently do, but if you possess aspirations for other things that you don’t vocalize, then who would know to consider you for any aligning opportunities?

 

When I did fashion segments on Breakfast Television as a representative for Le Chateau (with my appearances coordinated by Le Chateau’s PR), I had the idea to represent myself and showcase other brands by doing style segments as simply Christie Lohr, and not Christie Lohr of Le Chateau. I knew that I already had an established relationship with Breakfast Television so I went ahead and expressed my interest in being an all-around fashion expert. This wasn’t merely for me. I knew that showcasing other brands would definitely increase the range of topics that could be discussed on their style segment, therefore appealing to a wider audience. Breakfast Television recognized that too as they agreed it would be a great idea and thus, I became their fashion expert.

 

If you see an opportunity within your current company or within a personal connection’s company, then express your interest! Start by presenting a reason as to why you think that you could be a great fit for the role and any ideas that you would execute if you did adopt the role. Most people in management positions are quite receptive to ideas promoting the growth of their respective companies. You’d be surprised at how many people would be willing to give your ideas a shot if you simply put them forward. Think of being open and transparent regarding what you want as a chance to showcase your skills and aptitudes. Are you into fashion merchandising while you’re in a sales associate role? Then speak openly of your interest and approach your management with your personal inspiration/style boards! Perhaps you know that you could definitely fulfill a position that you were initially rejected for. Try to get in direct contact with recruitment to ask for feedback. The worst someone can say is no, and that really isn’t so bad (it’s not personal, and remember that!).

 

I requested an interview with Fashion Canada even after 3 internship rejections because I knew in my heart that I could fulfill the position well. They agreed to the interview request and I got the internship in the end. Would the results have been the same if I had just left it off after the rejections? Certainly not.”

 

I think what Christie discussed is a great way of approaching the task of “asking for what you want.” She’s right, most of us think of “asking” as “demanding,” and that’s definitely not the way to go. If we simply aimed to express our ideas and interests more openly in the face of our professional networks, then perhaps opportunity inquiries would become wholly less daunting of a task.

 

Have you ever had a missed opportunity because you were afraid to express your interest for fear of rejection? Make it a personal resolution to start asking for what you want by Christie’s terms to truly fast track our career development!

 

Be sure to tune in on Wednesday from 5-6pm PST for our live Twitter #SNTFCareerChat. This is the perfect time to tweet out any of your personal career questions for Christie to answer!

 

By: Anna Zhao

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.

Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram for the latest fashion jobs, career advice and fashion trends!

Career Chats With Christie Lohr: What Does “Above & Beyond” Really Mean?

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

Style Nine to Five - Fashion jobs NYC

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What does it truly take to succeed in your career, no matter the industry that you are a part of? For many of us, we’re not too certain where we will wind up unless we first experience various trials and tribulations. But for Christie Lohr, the founder of fashion job website Style Nine to Five, a career in the fashion industry was an established goal from the tender age of 10. In Style Nine to Five’s latest blog feature, Christie Lohr will be dishing out on the best in career advice that can be applied to any industry, fashion or otherwise. Expect discussions involving the true spirit of entrepreneurialism, dressing for success, asking for what you want in order to get what you want, and above all, persevering through any obstacle that obstructs your path. Let’s see what’s in store for our opening article to kick off this weekly feature.

 

Christie Lohr: ”One piece of advice that I’ve given time and time again in interviews, and when asked by any individual as to how to succeed in the fashion industry, is to go above and beyond what is asked of you on the job. Sure, this may be something that everyone is used to hearing over and over again from any professional, but I don’t think many people truly understand the underlying meaning of my statement. For example, most individuals start working in retail as a means to an end, never thinking that it’ll be the start of their career. What I think people often forget is the fact that many corporate hires from major fashion retailers come from within the company. If you prove yourself from an entry level position as a sales associate, you would be surprised at how many doors open for you. I remember phoning head office as a 17 year old, part time sales associate, to ask about what it takes to get a job in fashion marketing. From then on out, I would create inspiration boards for the sales team during my breaks, just because I wanted to, not because it was required of me from the job. I knew that I had to make the most of what I wanted from the job, and this certainly wasn’t an attitude that I abandoned even as I climbed through the retail ranks to Store Manager and Assistant Menswear Buyer for Le Chateau. As a Store Manager, I would constantly be thinking of new ways to hit and exceed the weekly store goals. Oftentimes, the best results were from the most unconventional of ideas. From getting a popular local DJ to come into the store on a rainy Saturday, to dressing up the entire sales team in Le Chateau’s own dresses to promote the product, I enjoyed my role the most when I kept my mind busy. I think many of us spend our time simply going through the paces on the job, but it really is up to ourselves to create opportunities. When I worked as an Assistant Menswear Buyer for Le Chateau, I would go to other stores on my days off to study the latest trends, and often would buy items that I thought Le Chateau should carry to show to the higher ups. I didn’t let my job title as Assistant Buyer restrict me from doing what I felt needed to be done.”

 

I think many of us that are just starting out in our professional careers can definitely relate to what Christie has just discussed. Personally, I know that I’ve fallen into the trap of thinking of some job opportunities are merely temporary, and disregarding them as a means to developing my career in the given industry. To conclude this week’s careers feature, I’d like to end off with a great quote from Christie:

“Your personal career growth is up to you and not your management. Create the opportunity for yourself by going above and beyond. Always work towards the position you want, not simply doing enough to get by in the position you have.”

 

Be sure to tune in on Tuesday from 12-1pm PST for our live Twitter #SNTFCareerChat. This is the perfect time to tweet out any of your personal career questions for Christie to answer!

 

Written by: Anna Zhao

 

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.

Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram for the latest fashion jobs, career advice and fashion trends!

NYE Fashion on CTV Morning Live

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013

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I share some New Year’s Eve fashion tips for men and women on CTV Morning Live. Click here to watch.

Fashion Jobs – Christie Lohr’s Gift Ideas

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

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Gifts for the Sartorialist

Recently I was feature in the The Westender: Growing up in Port Hardy (pop. 5,000) Christie Lohr always imagined something bigger. After undertaking her fashion marketing certificate at Kwantlen, studying broadcast journalism at BCIT and interning at MTV Canada and FASHION Magazine, the Vancouver transplant founded Style Nine to Five, a one-stop fashion career website that brings fashion industry employers and job seekers together, and Beauty Nine to Five, the sister site for beauty jobs. She is a household name in the Canadian fashion industry, and offers of these picks for the well-decked.

Other picks we couldn’t fit in The Westender:

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Fashion Leggings, Pink by Victoria’s Secret, 2 for $42 – Love them for layering of for lounging around!

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Le Chateau Jewel Encrusted Loafers, $60

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Erinlaura necklace, erinlaura.com, $60, Ask for her at Aritzia Pacific Center! She works there.
Love this feminine and edgy quartz crystal necklace with six brass spikes. Local gal Erin Johnson hand makes each piece.
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Lou Lou Childs photo

Fashion Jobs – Q&A with Christie Lohr of Style Nine to Five

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

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Before becoming a contributing blogger for Style Nine to Five, I used to come to this website every day. It was my one stop shop for job postings and interesting, fashion related blog posts. After landing a position representing Style Nine to Five at a fashion camp in Toronto, I got to know the mastermind behind the whole operation, Christie Lohr. Coming from the small town of Port Hardy, Christie always knew she was destined for something bigger. Working various positions in the fashion industry allowed Christie to come up with an idea to help connect fashion savvy people with Canadian employers in the industry, and thus Style Nine to Five was born. Since then, the brand has grown immensely, branching out to Beauty Nine to Five, creating a blog and becoming a household name for people in the fashion industry.  I got the chance to sit down with Christie Lohr and have an intimate Q&A moment discussing everything from her humble beginnings to her entrepreneurial spirit.

 

 1. When did you know you wanted to work in the fashion industry?

Growing up in Port Hardy with a population 5000, my childhood days were filled with catching frogs, building bonfires on the beach and climbing trees. There really weren’t a lot of girlie things to do. My creative side had me watching music videos and reading fashion magazines as my escape into the fashion world. That other “world” seemed so far away and just a fantasy that I hoped for one day to be a part of it. I remember my mom dropping me off at my babysitters in grade one before school and I would secretly change into wild outfits with crazy jewellery and baby blue eye shadow. I eventually got in trouble, but I never lost my desire to be in the fashion industry.

2. Did you complete any fashion related schooling or internships before diving into the Canadian fashion industry?

Yes, I undertook a Fashion Marketing Certificate at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, studied Broadcast Journalism at BCIT and was an intern at a showroom, MTV Canada and FASHION Magazine.

3. How did the idea for Style Nine to Five come about?

I’d worked many jobs within Le Chateau, including a menswear buyer and store manager, and after completing my internship at FASHION Magazine, I wanted to explore more options, so I became a Recruiter for Le Chateau. This was a job I loved because I got to represent the brand and find great talent to join the team. We posted on Monster, Workopolis and in newspapers. The candidates I received from these sites were usually not qualified. This is when I knew there had to be a better way to find fashion savvy job seekers! And like myself, after graduating from Kwantlen, I was searching for a career in fashion but didn’t know how to go about finding these jobs.

4. What were some challenges (if any) that you faced when creating STNF and how did you overcome them?

I think the biggest challenge was, and still is, getting the word out there and finding new ways to spread the word without resorting to standard ads. I launched without any advertising, just reaching out to my contacts in media and other recruiters who I met when I was a recruiter, networking is key.

5. Where do you hope to see the STNF brand five years from now?

In five years I’d like to see Style Nine to Five worldwide and for Beauty Nine to Five to be just as successful. Beauty Nine to Five is our sister site for beauty jobs.

6. You also do a segment on CTV Vancouver, what is the segment all about and how did you get your start with the CTV network?

The segment is about current trends or other fashion topics such what to wear to après ski or a summer music festival. It’s a lot of fun and further promotes the Style Nine to Five brand. I used to do fashion segments for a few other TV stations so when CTV launched their morning show, CTV Morning Live, I already had some connections and years of experience. I first got into TV while working at Le Chateau. As well as being a Recruiter, I was also their West Coast spokesperson as their head office is in Montreal, so I would do segments on local TV on their behalf.

7. What advice to do you have for readers looking to get into the fashion industry? Get yourself out there and work hard. Create your own job if it doesn’t exist, be nice, don’t be entitled – no one is going to discover you! I’m a strong believer in internships, I’ve done many myself and you really do learn a lot and get the chance to network and meet the right people in the industry that can connect you and steer you in the right direction.

By: Layan Barakat 

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.

Fashion Jobs – Career Talk with Style Nine to Five

Monday, October 7th, 2013

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Last week, Style Nine to Five Founder, Christie Lohr, answered your fashion career questions on Twitter. Here they are!

1. Question: @stylererouted ”Any advice for making it past the intern job title? #SNTFCareerChat 

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “Work hard and be nice because they will remember you for when an opening comes up! Oh and intern experiences are amazing for the resume and the right employer will see and value that! It’s easy to give up, but it’s those who don’t that make it!”

2. Question: @sunny_d_z ”What is your best advice on how to make a resume stand out?”

Answer: @StyleNineToFive ” Always include a cover letter that states why you love the company you’re applying to and why you’re so great! Keep your resume to the point and with the most relevant experience. Skip unnecessary info. I’m not a fan of ‘Interests’ on a resume.

3. Question: @maisonstylecdn “What are some key points/skills etc that employers look for on a resume?”

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “Leadership, length at a job (no hopping around), how you describe your job role, volunteer experience.”

4. Question: @KiyoshaTeixeira “In order to network with people how do you refrain from coming off as a “groupie”? Would you say emailing is better?”

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “Never FB or Tweet at someone if you want to be taken seriously. Email them introducing yourself and ask to meet for a coffee meeting”

5. Question: @maisonstylecdn “What’s the best approach to a company you want to work for even if they aren’t hiring?

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “Introduce yourself. Send an email on why you want to work for them and how much you’re interested should a position open.”

6. Question: @stylererouted “How did you know it was the right decision to strike out on your own?”

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “I had enough experience, knowledge, confidence and networks in what I wanted to do.  I would not have succeeded if I started this even 5 years ago.”

7. Question: @NiksD87 “What qualities or skills make an applicant stand out from the rest of the pack?”

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “Leadership, length at a job (no hopping around), volunteer experience,  relavant education.”

8. Question: @RobynPY “Networking seems to be the more efficient route to take when looking for jobs. Is the traditional résumé becoming obsolete?”

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “Not at all! They really are your 1st impression. If you’re not lucky enough to have the networking opportunities, resumes are key.  I get resumes daily, and I’ll meet with someone based on a good resume even if I’m not hiring.”

9. Question: @rosemarymelnyk “Is it okay to contact someone via LinkedIn for a professional informational meeting? #STFNCareerChat”

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “ Yes, but you may not get a response. I prefer email still! See if you can find their email address online. #SNTFCareerChat”

10. Question: @moegenore I saw you say “job hopping” isn’t good. What would you recommend for someone who has had many jobs (as a student)?”

Answer: @StyleNineToFive “Job hopping just shows either lack of commitment or you may not have been a good fit. Only include relevant jobs! Not all!  I should clarify, you should avoid company hopping..you can try many jobs within that company!”

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.

Fashion Jobs – Win a Mini Mentorship with Christie

Monday, September 9th, 2013

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We want to know what your ultimate fashion dream job is! In return you could win the chance to receive Style Nine to Five and Beauty Nine to Five founder, Christie Lohr’s expertise in how to land it. If you are chosen, Christie will look over your resume and cover letter, giving you a comprehensive edit to help get you noticed by prospective employers. Not only that, Christie will offer her advice on steps to take in going forward, the types of experience that will enrich your resume and make you an ideal candidate for your dream job. Head over to twitter for your chance to win this very stylish opportunity!

Contest ends Friday, Sept 20th at midnight!

How to Enter:

Tweet the following: “RT & tell us your dream job & be entered to win a mentorship from @StyleNineToFive founder @Christie_Lohr! More info: http://ow.ly/oI3NV”

 

Photo Credit: Marc Marayag

Originally published in Framework Magazine.

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.