Posts Tagged ‘fashion career advice’

Fashion Career Advice with Christie Lohr

Saturday, June 30th, 2018

Style Nine to Five - Fashion Jobs in CanadaCHRISTIE LOHR6

 

Listen to Christie Lohr’s fashion career journey in this podcast she did with Glam Observer. She gives resume and cover letter tips, how to break into the fashion industry, what fashion employers look for in a job candidate, should you go to fashion school or is getting the fashion experience enough? Listen HERE.

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Fashion Career Advice with Christie Lohr

Tuesday, May 15th, 2018

Style Nine to Five - Fashion Jobs in CanadaCHRISTIE LOHR5Looking to get your foot in the fashion door? Let our Founder Christie Lohr help you! This is perfect for those who’ve been unable to attend our fashion career workshops in Vancouver or for those who don’t live in Vancouver.

Fashion Jobs – Fashion Career Advice Round-up

Friday, November 14th, 2014

Style Nine to Five - fashion jobs nycFashion Jobs - Fashion Career Advice

For this week’s career advice feature, we’re sharing all of our past topics! Click on the below to read the whole article.

 

What does ‘Above and Beyond’ really mean? 

Asking for what you want. 

Reach out to break out.

How to answer the difficult interview questions.

How to write a cover letter.

Finding your calling.

How to face criticism. 

Importance of internships.

How to start your own business.

Perfection is overrated. 

What makes an applicant stand out?

What do fashion employers look for in a candidate?

How do you define your dream job?

It’s not a competition.

What are common mistakes applicants make? 

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Fashion Jobs – Fashion Career Advice

Friday, November 7th, 2014

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Have you ever sent in what you believed to be a killer resume for a job opening, or walked out of an interview thinking that you absolutely nailed it, only to never hear back from the prospective employer? If so, then you may be guilty of one of the following faux pas that various employers have identified as common amongst job seekers.

What’s a common mistake applicants make?

 

Sarah Anderson from Aritzia in Vancouver: 

They focus on the wrong things. I want them to tell me about themselves, who they are, and what they are passionate about. Instead, they often try to focus on what makes them an ideal candidate. The interview should feel natural – like a conversation! The last thing I want a candidate to do is tell me what they think I want to hear.

 

Sebastian Ramirez from Alexander Nash in NYC

I recently received an application from a candidate who described himself as a “fashion protégé”. Confidence is good, but egos are a dime a dozen and they denote that you may be a person who doesn’t follow instructions well. After all, I’m not a “fashion protégé” so why would you listen to me?

 

Sarah Cumming from 3×1 in New York:

Not doing their homework about the company. Read everything you can find before walking in the door for your interview. Be prepared to have an awesome answer to “so, what do you know about our company?”  Don’t just say “I loved your last collection,” unless you’re a designer. Try and investigate what makes the company’s operations unique – where they source their materials, find their recent press, follow them on social media to get a real sense of what they’re doing, and try to think about what the company might be challenged with internally. That’s why they’re hiring for the position!

 

Jordana Scarapicchia from Le Chateau in Montreal:

Often, candidates forget to proofread their resumes before submitting them. As a result, we often see spelling/grammatical errors, and incorrect dates. Most candidates work with a resume template and then make modifications to their resume based on which employer they are submitting their application to. Many times, candidates forget to make these modifications and leave other employers’ information on their resume. Candidates are so worried about the content of their cover letters and resumes that they often forget to include their basic information, such as their telephone numbers and e-mail addresses.

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By: Anna Zhao

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

Are you a job seeker? Find fashion jobs here.

Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram for the latest fashion jobs, career advice and fashion trends!

Fashion Jobs – Fashion Career Advice: What Makes An Applicant Stand Out?

Thursday, October 30th, 2014

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Last week, we got a chance to hear what other employers had to say about making it in the industry, and the one piece of advice that they would give to individuals looking to pursue a career in fashion. When it comes to the actual application and screening process, what makes a candidate stand out amongst the pack? Known for being a highly competitive playing field, we set out to discover what different fashion employers each look for when they’re making the hiring decisions.

 

Christie Lohr asks: What makes an applicant stand out to you?

 

Sebastian Ramirez from Alexander Nash in NYC: Their relevant experience. School is important but companies need to know that you have the discipline to do simple tasks.

 

Sarah Cumming from 3×1 in New York:  When they have identified their specific passion and can explain it well through examples. Example: “I love analyzing sales figures to determine future seasons’ merchandise plans. I built a spreadsheet to do this quickly in my last job. The collection was much tighter than previous seasons, and sell-through in the next season was X% higher.”

 

Jordana Scarapicchia from Le Chateau in Montreal: Creative resumes always stand out! I am always impressed when I receive a resume that is visually appealing (not your standard template), but without getting too caught up with the design and still focused on the content of the resume.  A well written cover letter also goes a long way! It is important to write a letter that is personalized, does not sound too generic and is pertinent to the role that you are applying for. Your cover letter is your employer’s first look at your communication/ writing style so be sure to write your best!

 

Sarah Anderson from Aritzia in Vancouver: Their ability to understand and, subsequently propel our brand during the interview.

 

Photo by Michelle Morton

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Fashion Jobs – Fashion Career Advice: Dream Job

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

Style Nine to Five - fashion jobsFashion Career Advice

 

How would you define your dream job? Where do you see yourself in 5 years? We’re asked that often in interviews but have you actually thought of this? Take a moment to truly reflect on what you, as individuals want, free from any external influences. These factors include family, peer, as well as societal expectations, and even pressures that we place on ourselves. Given all the distractions and disruptions in our immediate environments, it becomes difficult to think only of what would make us happy.

 

Christie: A dream job should lie at the point of impact between your passions and skills. It should be completely unique to you, because there is no other person like you out there. Why rely on conventional job titles to describe what you would call your ideal career? Who cares if your dream job description doesn’t exist? Create your own if you have to! Stay true to what you want, and make achieving that goal your Plan A. When I launched Style Nine to Five, I knew that I had finally taken the first major step in attaining what I had always dreamed of. I had no Plan B because I didn’t want one. While that may create a high pressure environment to succeed for many, I found it motivating as it forced me to work that much harder to make sure that I did not fail.

 

However, owning a business is not the right path for everyone. In fact, for many of you, your dream job already exists in today’s employment marketplace. If that is the case, then carefully examine your wants and needs when mapping out your career plan. Other aspects of the “job,” including the geographical location of where you will work and the company culture are just as important as the actual job description. If you know that you want to work in New York City, at an open concept office environment that is more casual than corporate, then you’ve just helped yourself narrow down your choices. This isn’t about eliminating possibilities, rather, it’s about staying true to what will make you happy. You should be especially picky when it comes to your future career! After all, who wants to waste their time doing something that they don’t enjoy?

By: Anna Zhao

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Fashion Jobs – Fashion Career Advice: No Competition

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Style Nine to Five - Fashion Jobs

Fashion Career AdviceThe fashion industry is often noted as being highly competitive in nature. And while the actual availability of jobs may reflect just that, the sense of competition and the feelings of stress that are often associated with it are arguably self-induced. It’s impossible to control the external happenings around us, but what we can control is our own self development. When it comes to landing your dream job, think of the process as less a competition with every other candidate, and more as a personal challenge. Having seen it all, Christie’s here to shed some light in regards to how a competition mindset may actually be hindering your professional growth.

 

Christie:  There will be stylists more fashionable then you, journalists smarter than you, that’s ok, that doesn’t mean there’s no room for you. It’s not a competition. I’ve always said this. No matter how great you believe yourself to be at something, there will always be someone that can do the same thing a little (or a lot) better than you can. While that realization may be disheartening, it is in no way a sign that there’s no room for you in the professional playing field. The moment you start focusing your energies on what are considered uncontrollable, such as the other candidates you may be up against for a job opening, is the moment you’ve just done yourself a great disservice. Rather than worrying about what others can and cannot do, focus on what you can do and how you can improve upon your own skill-sets. The only real competition is with yourself, and a motto I live by is simply, “do you.”

 

We all move forward in our own time, which means some people may get to the same destination before you do. That’s okay! You know yourself the best, and if you need an extra few years to build up your repertoire, don’t feel as if you’ve failed. If I had started Style Nine to Five at 25 instead of 30, it probably wouldn’t have been as successful a venture or successful at all for that matter. The knowledge that I acquired in the 5 years were completely necessary to get me to where I am today. I’ve made many mistakes along the way, and I still have plenty of things to figure out. Regardless, day by day, I learn a bit more than the previous day, and I wouldn’t trade that time in for anything. Given how precious time is, every moment I spend comparing myself to someone else is wasted time that I could have spent on furthering my own development. Remember, you are your own worst enemy, and the moment you free yourself from the self-doubt is the moment you’ve just opened a world of possibilities.

Photo by Laura McIntosh

By: Anna Zhoa

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Career Advice With Christie Lohr – How to Respond to Criticism

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Style Nine to Five - Fashion Jobs

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One of the hardest things to hear is criticism, and that’s not necessarily something that changes over time. Whether it’s criticism towards an idea or an action, the difficulty comes with finding out the discrepancy between what others perceive of what you do or deliver, and how you perceive it all yourself. If you think that your solution to a problem will solve all, while the rest of your team would beg to differ, your confidence would certainly take a hit (even if you don’t want to admit it). However, when it comes to personal growth, Christie argues that learning to accept criticism where it counts is a fundamental professional and personal skill to develop.

 

Christie: When I was starting out in my professional career, taking criticism from my higher ups was definitely difficult. I feel that we were probably all at our most arrogant state during the start of our careers, even if we would like to argue otherwise. After all, we hadn’t been knocked down by life, management, and peers quite as much at that point, and any criticism we may have received prior to our first real job certainly didn’t hold the same amount of weight. Back when I took on my first managerial role at 18, I was convinced that I was the best around, even though I was still green. While I proved myself enough to have been promoted to a position in management to begin with, I hadn’t yet paid my dues or really done anything to earn the respect of my employees. I simply assumed that it was a given that came with the role. Boy was I wrong. When my supervisor at the time gave me feedback regarding my performance, I was stung. The problem was, I needed to learn to view myself from their perspective, and through an objective lens at that. If your natural instinct is to become defensive, don’t. Avoid the urge! In fact, force yourself to listen for once so you can actually hear what your peers have to say. No criticism is given with the purpose of attacking you as an individual, and that’s the first thing you have to recognize. Every piece of feedback given on the job is meant to help you improve. Most people don’t want to see you fail, especially your higher ups. They hired and/ or promoted you for a reason! Forget making excuses and playing the role of the victim. Nobody can respect an individual who doesn’t want to own up to their mistakes.

 

If you do have a valid response to any criticism you receive, then reply with your rationale and facts, not opinions. State everything clearly and try to rein your emotions in. The last thing you want is to say something in the spur of the moment that you’ll regret later on. I’d like to stress again how important listening is. We have a personal monologue running in our heads 24/7, so taking that 5 or 10 minutes of mental silence to truly absorb feedback from others is a necessary habit to get into.

 

Photo by Laura McIntosh

 

By: Anna Zhao

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Fashion Jobs – Career Advice with Christie Lohr – The Internship

Friday, September 19th, 2014

Style Nine to Five - Fashion Jobs

Fashion Jobs - Internship Advice

 

With so much competition nowadays in virtually every industry and career field, getting a job right out of school with no real work experience to cite on your resume has become rather difficult. This is especially true for the fashion industry as many positions call for practical and applicable skills that could only have been acquired from performing tasks while on the job. For example, think PR – although having a degree in it is one thing, textbooks and classes alone are not enough to prepare you for the unpredictable nature of the real job. Only past work experience can. That is where the internship comes in. While individuals generally recognize the merit of an internship, sometimes the idea of being a temporary/contract employee, and not being well compensated for the work performed may discourage many from doing the best that they can during the duration of their internship. This, according to Christie, is one of the biggest career faux pas you can make, and she’s here to tell you why.

 

Christie: I have always been a fan of internships. Not only can you learn and develop so many useful skills during an internship that you will ultimately take with you throughout your professional career, it is also a great opportunity to build lasting connections. Although most internships (especially in the fashion industry) may not offer the best compensation in comparison to the amount of time that you’ll likely be putting into it, that doesn’t make the experience any less valuable than a permanent position with the company. I always say: treat your internship like it’s any other job where you would want to make the best impression possible. If anything, you want to prove yourself even more in an internship scenario because you’re not a permanent employee for the company yet. An internship can either land you a future job, or a recommendation that will lead to your future job, or it can leave you with a bad professional reputation instead.

 

Although a company may not be in a position to hire you yet, if you demonstrate your abilities, tenacity and overall strong work ethic during your internship, you’ll definitely be the first person they think of when an actual job opening comes along. After all, you’ll save them the time and money of advertising for the posting and interviewing for it too. The relationships you establish through your internship may very well land you a job, even if it’s just through a glowing recommendation from your employer. However, the opposite of this is also very true, in the sense that if you prove to be nothing but lazy and unmotivated during your internship, not only will you likely never hear from the company again, but your employer probably won’t have many positive things to say about you afterwards either. Remember, every job or internship you take on will leave some sort of mark on your professional track record. It’s up to you whether you want to make it a good one or not.

 

Photo by Michelle Morton

 

Written by Anna Zhao

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Fashion Career Advice From Christie Lohr – Reach Out to Break Out

Friday, August 29th, 2014

style nine to five - fashion jobs Christie Lohr

To any fashion hopeful who is just starting out in his or her career, having a mentor is one of the best ways to gain invaluable information regarding the industry. Whether it’s interview advice, insider knowledge about what employers look for, or tips to succeed in your personal endeavours, speaking with a seasoned veteran will definitely be a rewarding experience. While the idea of reaching out to anybody you don’t know can seem like a daunting task at first, Christie’s here to tell you why it will all be worth it, and that it isn’t such a scary thing after all.

 

Christie Lohr: What inspired me to pursue a career in the fashion industry was a fated meeting with a fashion expert in my early 20s. I was an eager young fashion grad, fresh out of college and working as an Assistant Manager at Le Chateau. I was on my way to a Nelly Furtado concert at the Vogue on Granville Street in Downtown Vancouver when I was suddenly stopped by this fashion expert who wanted to take my photo for her upcoming street style feature for The Province newspaper. At the time, I was so excited to be featured in a major publication like The Province. This fated meeting definitely inspired me to explore my options in the fashion industry and learn more about how I could get involved. I thought to myself, how cool would it be to speak with this fashion reporter and see if I could assist her in any way? Acting on that thought, I found her email address online and proceeded to send her a message, thanking her for the feature, as well as inquiring if I could be a part of what she was doing. I don’t know if I expected a reply at the time, and quite honestly, whenever you do decide to reach out to someone, know that they probably have a busy schedule so don’t be discouraged if you don’t see a reply right away! I heard back from her after a few days and we scheduled a coffee meeting, where I was able to pick her brain and inquire if I could be of any help to her work. Although she wasn’t even looking for assistance, just because I reached out and asked, she brought me on board!

 

I think the moral of my story is simply to not be afraid to reach out to anyone you look up to as a mentor, or who you aspire to be like. Yes we’re all busy, but I can tell you that there’s nothing more special and flattering than receiving a thoughtful email from someone who’s truly passionate about the industry and who expresses a strong desire to learn from me. I know I was so eager to learn (and still am) back when I was in my early 20s and just starting out in my fashion career. I’m at a point in my life now where I want to give back by offering my time to speak with and educate any driven young individual, and I know that many industry insiders share my sentiments. We were all at the same place once upon a time, and I can definitely say that I would not be where I am today without my mentors.

Whenever you meet someone in the industry who you want to get to know more, send them a follow-up email and schedule out a time to talk! You’d be surprised at how many doors can open for you and how much you can learn just from taking the first step to connect.

 

Photo by Laura McIntosh

Written by Anna Zhao 

Are you an employer? Post your fashion job here.

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